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gardening, organic garden, seeds

The latest gardening information, from the most interesting sources, all in one place.

Urban Garden Casual,  Thu, 23 Nov 2017 05:18:47 GMT  

Caring For Your Urban Lawn
City life can be exhausting. A long daily commute through a concrete jungle of gray and brown is a reality of life for many in and around our urban areas. But amid this manmade, non-organic reality, small urban yards can be the sanctuary we need to escape, relax and recharge after a tiring day. You […]
Photo Credit: Urban-Waterfall by Trois Têtes (TT) used under CC BY-NC 2.0

Photo Credit: Urban-Waterfall by Trois Têtes (TT) used under CC BY-NC 2.0

City life can be exhausting.

A long daily commute through a concrete jungle of gray and brown is a reality of life for many in and around our urban areas.

But amid this manmade, non-organic reality, small urban yards can be the sanctuary we need to escape, relax and recharge after a tiring day.

You may be fortunate enough to have a lawn, and if so you shouldn’t take this for granted.

Taking care of your lawn can often be an enjoyable and relaxing activity, and it creates a beautiful space for you to enjoy with friends, family and neighbors alike.

The first thing you need to consider when caring for your lawn is how you intend to keep it maintained. In an urban space, it is important to make the most of the area that you have, so you can get the fullest experience from your yard. This invariably means keeping your lawn well trimmed and neat, if you decide to have one at all.

A mechanical lawn mower is now considered an essential for cutting your lawn efficiently, and you should consider a model appropriate to the size of the area you need to maintain. In case your lawn mower breaks down, it may be worth identifying equipment repair companies, such as Pat’s power equipment repair.

You should take care to keep your grass trim and short, according to your preference. A well-manicured lawn can add value to your home, while making your yard the envy of your neighbors. With the right lawn mower at your disposal, it should be possible to efficiently cut your grass as and when required.

It is important to water your lawn during dry periods of weather, and people often use sprinkler systems to ensure effective watering at appropriate intervals. Especially in hot summers, it can be important to keep the grass well watered, to prevent the lawn from drying out and eventually dying. You may also want to supplement your watering with nutrients, which can help to keep your lawn looking its best.

When you are using nutrients, fertilizers and other products on your lawn, it is essential to think about the environment, and the health of pets, wildlife and young children. Toxic sprays and formulas might be good for the health of your yard, but not always for the wildlife you might want to attract. Instead, it is preferable to choose organic products for lawn care, ensuring you can achieve a safe but effective treatment. Keep in mind that lawn clippings decompose quickly and will act as a fertilizer. There’s need to clean them up, unless they’re really long.

Caring for your lawn does not have to take up all of your spare time. With the right tools, and a simple, consistent approach, you can keep your lawn luscious and well manicured. This will help make sure you can enjoy your yard to the fullest, so you can properly start to relax after another stressful day in the city.

 


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/rss,  Thu, 23 Nov 2017 05:18:47 GMT  


You Grow Girl,  Thu, 23 Nov 2017 05:18:47 GMT  

Misfit Gardens and Misfit Gardeners
I wrote this short piece recently as a series of tweets on Twitter and then transcribed it to my Instagram and Facebook accounts. But because too much falls into the social media ether these days, I have transcribed it here with a few small changes. When I was 16, going on 17, I dug my
#growcurious30 Day One: Taste
I chose TASTE as my prompt for the first day. My original plan was to choose a handful of different basil varieties and make comparisons between the flavours of the different flowers as a way to get to know them better. However, once I was out in the garden I found myself tempted by several
Grow Curious 30
With the garden season winding down or gearing up depending on your location, now is a time when many of us are getting back into the garden after some time off. I thought it would be fun to take advantage of the seasonal shift and start a community Grow Curious project that anyone can do,

About.com Gardening: What's Hot Now,  Mon, 27 Mar 2017 10:25:02 GMT  

Avocado Tree from Pit
Avocado Tree from Pit. Gardening. Page 7.
A New Foundation
A New Foundation. Gardening. Page 8.
About Gardening - Submit a Gardening Tip
Submit a Gardening Tip Controlling Snails and Slugs. Share What's Worked in Your Garden and What Hasn't.

A Gardener's Notebook,  Thu, 23 Nov 2017 05:18:48 GMT  

14 Garden Arbor | Douglas E. Welch Holiday Gift Guide 2017
See all the 2017 Gift Guide Entries 14 Garden Arbor From Douglas… We have been meaning to get a trellis for the Lady Bank’s Rose in the front garden for a long time, but it wasn’t growing very fast and we concentrated on other, more important tasks. That all changed this Winter and Spring, though. […]

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14 Garden Arbor

From Douglas…

We have been meaning to get a trellis for the Lady Bank’s Rose in the front garden for a long time, but it wasn’t growing very fast and we concentrated on other, more important tasks. That all changed this Winter and Spring, though. With the large amount of rain we had — along with the removal of a short fence that was blocking the sun — the rose added a lot of vigorous growth and bloomed quite nicely, even for a relatively small plant. You can see from the photos that it was big enough to cover most of the side of the trellis after we trimmed and tied the main stake to the newly built arbor. 

We need to do a bit more staking to prevent any blow down during our windy days and you can see an ugly remaining fence post that we need to cut off as best we can. it is set in cement and littered with nails so I need to find a clear path through so I can use the hand saw to cut it down as low as possible.

Looking out the window after cleaning up from out work, Rosanne said “It looks like it has always been there” and indeed it does. it blends in well, while also adding a nice decorative touch.

If you are looking for an arbor for your garden, this “Athens” model is all vinyl and no maintenance, something I had to have when I went looking.

Assembly was easy and required nothing more than a power screwdriver to drive the self-tapping screws. I look forward to it being here for many years to come.


* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs

Rhododendron at University of Otago via Instagram
Rhododendron at University of Otago A late Winter/early Spring rhododendron blooms on the campus of the University of Otago. Join me on Douglas E. Welch Photography on Facebook Learn more about rhododendron with these  books * A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs ** Many of these books may be available […]

Rhododendron at University of Otago via Instagram

Rhododendron at University of Otago

A late Winter/early Spring rhododendron blooms on the campus of the University of Otago.

Instagram

Join me on Douglas E. Welch Photography on Facebook


Learn more about rhododendron with these  books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!

08 The Bold Dry Garden: Lessons from the Ruth Bancroft Garden | Douglas E. Welch Holiday Gift Guide 2017
See all the 2017 Gift Guide Entries 08 The Bold Dry Garden: Lessons from the Ruth Bancroft Garden by Johanna Silver (Author), Marion Brenner (Photographer) If you truly want to know and understand a garden, you need to walk the garden with the owner, the creator, the designer or the head gardener. They can show […]

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08 The Bold Dry Garden: Lessons from the Ruth Bancroft Garden by Johanna Silver (Author), Marion Brenner (Photographer)

If you truly want to know and understand a garden, you need to walk the garden with the owner, the creator, the designer or the head gardener. They can show and tell you small things that you might not notice on your own or explain grand themes and plans which are only subtly visible in the garden but underpin everything. Books like The Bold Dry Garden are the next best thing to walking the paths with the owners and hearing the stories of how the garden was created, how this plant or the other was acquired, the grand successes and dismal failures. You get a sense for all these in The Bold Dry Garden. The author and photographer seek to make the garden accessible to anyone no matter where they might be in the world. Even though I only live 5-6 hours drive from the Ruth Bancroft Garden I had not heard of it and, of course, have never visited. This book has changed that th0ugh. Now I am intimately familiar with creator Ruth Bancroft’s history, the evolving garden design and even particular specimen plants included in the garden.

The Bold Dry Garden begins with “Meet Ruth”. This recounts Ruth’s early history from her childhood to the point where, at age 63, after most of the surrounding farmland had been sold off for subdivisions, she started to build the garden. From this start in 1971, the garden grew and changed until it became part of the Garden Conservancy in 1991. This addition helped to preserve and maintain the gardens for generations to come. The bulk of The Bold Dry Garden is the section entitled “Signature Plants of the Dry Garden.” Here you find detailed accounts and photos of many of the plants in the garden including agaves and aloes, echeveria and sempervivum, euphorbium and crassula. This is a veritable encyclopedia for succulents lovers and an excellent reference book, as well as one to simply read from cover to cover as if you were walking through the garden itself. The descriptions and photographs can give you both interesting ideas and detailed information for seeing how these plants might fit into your own garden.

Now that I have read The Bold Dry Garden, I plan on visiting the next time I am in Northern California. In fact, I will probably go out of my way to visit, even if I am just passing through. A garden like The Ruth Bancroft Garden is always a treat to visit and my appetite has been whet with this amazing, written and photographed, introduction.


* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† This book is available at the LA Public LIbrary


http://www.sciencedaily.com/rss/plants_animals/botany.xml,  Thu, 23 Nov 2017 05:18:48 GMT  


http://www.goarticles.com/feeds/Gardening/recent.rss,  Thu, 17 Nov 2016 20:04:57 GMT  


http://www.seattlepi.com/rss/gardening_2.rss,  Thu, 23 Nov 2017 05:18:49 GMT  


http://blog.gardenersworld.com/feed/,  Thu, 23 Nov 2017 05:18:49 GMT  


http://www.zanthan.com/gardens/gardenlog/?feed=rss2,  Thu, 03 Nov 2016 02:18:08 GMT  


Organic Gardening News and Advice,  Thu, 23 Nov 2017 05:18:50 GMT  

New Book of Short Stories from Mort Mather
A Stone's Throw, Orvie's Stories
Back in the earliest days of the internet, Mort Mather looked around for someone to help him publish his work in this new cyberspace thing. He found me. We published his archive of organic gardening information which has helped hundreds of thousands of people garden organically.

We've been friends ever since. In fact, he still owes us a dinner at his son's excellent restaurant in Wells, Maine: Joshua's. Mort grows most of the restaurant's fresh, organic produce every year.

Mort's new book is A Stone's Throw, Orvie's Stories. You can read several pages of praise for these short stories on his site. Here's a taste:

“Mort Mather has captured the feel, the sounds and smells of rural life in the 40's”—U.S. Congresswoman Chellie Pingree

“Mort's writing is every bit as wonderful as the food in his splendid restaurant.”—J. Courtney Sullivan, author of the New York Times best­selling novels Commencement, Maine, and The Engagements

“A Stone's Throw is a wonderful collection of stories, told from the perspective of Orvie, a young boy growing up in the 1940s. Orvie's world is a swirl of outdoor adventures, forts, farm animal, school, chores, and family struggles. Through witty dialogue, rich descriptions of life on the farm, and the captivating voice of Orvie himself, Mort Mather invites you to enter Orvie's childlike imagination, and to remember your own. I love these stories and I know you will too.”—Patricia Leavy, Ph.D., best­selling author or Blue and Low­Fat Love 

A Stone's Throw is available from Maine Writers Publishing. Visit Mort's site to find out how to get an autographed copy!

Mort is a shareholder of Good to Go Farm-to-Counter, LLC, our small, organic and local food takeout restaurant opening soon in Cherry Valley, NY. We still have $100 shares in the LLC available to our friends. To find out how you can invest, click here!



Farm to Counter: The Next Great Thing
To call this a "grilled cheese" would be an insult.
We've been working on creating Good to Go, our local and organic food takeout restaurant, for a few months now. So it was with great interest that we read this recent article in the New York Times on the "farm to counter" movement. It's the Next Great Thing!

After decades of public hand-wringing about the empty calories and environmental impact of fast food, the farm-to-table notions that have revolutionized higher-end American restaurants have finally found a lucrative spot in the takeout line. The result already has a nickname: farm to counter. 

“This is not a passing fad,” said B. Hudson Riehle, the research director for the National Restaurant Association, who added that locally grown food and sustainability were the top two customer priorities reported this year in the group’s annual poll of American chefs. “It’s only going to get stronger.”

We knew this was a good idea, but we had no idea the idea was already catching on and some farm-to-counter operations are already becoming chain restaurants. If you're interested in getting in on the ground floor of the Good to Go project, which we now hope could become a chain someday, get involved! We're crowd-funding a 20% share of the company!
Good to Go is Good to Go So Let's Go!
The following post is from our new site for our new business: Good to Go Organic and Local Food Takeout Restaurant. Robin and I jumped on the chance to take over the very small space of the former Nectar Hills Farm store in Cherry Valley, NY, and turn it into a small, to-go only restaurant featuring organic and local food from our area. 

We are crowd-funding the venture--offering shares for $100 worth 0.1% of the company. We hope to sell 200 shares, worth 20% of the company. We're asking our friends, family, and readers to buy shares and support this effort to bring local and organic food to the tables, sidewalks, and picnic areas of our beautiful part of the central leather-stocking region of upstate NY. Visit the website for more information on how to invest (be sure to read the business plan).

The storefront of Good to Go Organic and
Local Food Takeout Restaurant in Cherry Valley, NY
Hi, Everyone,

My lease is signed, and 17 1/2 Main Street is waiting patiently for me to turn it into a tasty, healthy dynamo of a little kitchen. To do that, I'll need a bank loan, and to get that, I need an impressive show of support. From Friends, Family, Sustainable Food Enthusiasts, Upstate Small Business Investors, and of course, the many that want to see our dear Cherry Valley flourish. 

Here are the details

The bottom line is this:  When I open, I will give this kitchen all I have:  my heart and soul, blood, sweat and tears, and time and energy.  The copious amount of encouraging words I've received has been overwhelming,  but what I need from each of you now is another cliche altogether: put your money where your mouth is. 

If you can't afford a whole share, go in on one with somebody.  That's only fifty bucks:  one for every year of my life that has led me to this very point. Please, I am raring to go. Literally: Good To Go.  Help me get started: stomachs, palates, lives, minds, farms, the economy, the state, karma, earth...all these things will improve with this venture. Get excited with me. 

Love and thanks,
Robin Supak
Peas and Greens are Not Enough--Good Thing We Have Ramps!
Organic fertilizer honor wagon near Roseboom, NY
It's mud season up here in the Northeast, and this is the time of year I start itching to get in the mud  pit. It's also the time of year I envy you folks at more southern latitudes, who are probably already eating things from your garden. We're still a few weeks away from eating the ramps (aka wild leeks) that have poked up through the leaf carpet in the woods behind our house, little oases of green in the sea of brown.

Harvesting ramps, by the way, is considered foraging, but since they're just a few steps away from the back garden rows, and we take careful steps to make sure they spread (we only take 25% of each patch, we collect the seeds and spread them in new areas, and we sometimes plant bulbs in new areas), it's kind of like they're part of the garden. A delicious, garlicy, spinachy, oniony, leaky, mouth watering part of the garden [Homer Simpson gurgling sounds]...

All the muddy beds were overwintered with our local, organic nitrogen source, pictured here bagged and for sale in its honor wagon down the road. There's not much I can do until that mud dries up and I can get out there and plant. In the mean time, I've been bringing in more manure and building beds in areas that dry out faster, where I've been planting early greens, spinach, and peas. The deer really love the young pea shoots, but when it's still dropping below freezing at night (the forecast low for tonight is 25), I have to put a plastic tunnel cover over the row anyway, to keep the ground temp up, and that keeps the deer away from the peas until they're big enough that the deer aren't interested anymore.

Someday I'll stop playing those silly games with the wild animals, and just put an electric fence up, but for now, it's all about row covers, timing, and trapping and relocating. Last year I didn't get the trap up until after the woodchuck had eaten all the dill. This year, the trap is out already.

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Gardening Question of the Day (from The Old Farmer's Almanac),  Thu, 23 Nov 2017 05:18:50 GMT  

Gardening Question of the Day for Thursday, November 23, 2017
What makes a Kirby cucumber burpless? (answer).

From The Old Farmer's Almanac.


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