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gardening, organic garden, seeds

The latest gardening information, from the most interesting sources, all in one place.

Urban Garden Casual,  Wed, 20 Mar 2019 21:19:23 GMT  

Caring For Your Urban Lawn
City life can be exhausting. A long daily commute through a concrete jungle of gray and brown is a reality of life for many in and around our urban areas. But amid this manmade, non-organic reality, small urban yards can be the sanctuary we need to escape, relax and recharge after a tiring day. You […]
Photo Credit: Urban-Waterfall by Trois Têtes (TT) used under CC BY-NC 2.0

Photo Credit: Urban-Waterfall by Trois Têtes (TT) used under CC BY-NC 2.0

City life can be exhausting.

A long daily commute through a concrete jungle of gray and brown is a reality of life for many in and around our urban areas.

But amid this manmade, non-organic reality, small urban yards can be the sanctuary we need to escape, relax and recharge after a tiring day.

You may be fortunate enough to have a lawn, and if so you shouldn’t take this for granted.

Taking care of your lawn can often be an enjoyable and relaxing activity, and it creates a beautiful space for you to enjoy with friends, family and neighbors alike.

The first thing you need to consider when caring for your lawn is how you intend to keep it maintained. In an urban space, it is important to make the most of the area that you have, so you can get the fullest experience from your yard. This invariably means keeping your lawn well trimmed and neat, if you decide to have one at all.

A mechanical lawn mower is now considered an essential for cutting your lawn efficiently, and you should consider a model appropriate to the size of the area you need to maintain. In case your lawn mower breaks down, it may be worth identifying equipment repair companies, such as Pat’s power equipment repair.

You should take care to keep your grass trim and short, according to your preference. A well-manicured lawn can add value to your home, while making your yard the envy of your neighbors. With the right lawn mower at your disposal, it should be possible to efficiently cut your grass as and when required.

It is important to water your lawn during dry periods of weather, and people often use sprinkler systems to ensure effective watering at appropriate intervals. Especially in hot summers, it can be important to keep the grass well watered, to prevent the lawn from drying out and eventually dying. You may also want to supplement your watering with nutrients, which can help to keep your lawn looking its best.

When you are using nutrients, fertilizers and other products on your lawn, it is essential to think about the environment, and the health of pets, wildlife and young children. Toxic sprays and formulas might be good for the health of your yard, but not always for the wildlife you might want to attract. Instead, it is preferable to choose organic products for lawn care, ensuring you can achieve a safe but effective treatment. Keep in mind that lawn clippings decompose quickly and will act as a fertilizer. There’s need to clean them up, unless they’re really long.

Caring for your lawn does not have to take up all of your spare time. With the right tools, and a simple, consistent approach, you can keep your lawn luscious and well manicured. This will help make sure you can enjoy your yard to the fullest, so you can properly start to relax after another stressful day in the city.

 


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/rss,  Tue, 27 Feb 2018 03:44:10 GMT  


You Grow Girl,  Wed, 20 Mar 2019 21:19:23 GMT  

Cannabis Diaries: On Growing Our Own
Last winter, I suffered through a period of excruciating migraines. At one point I basically had one massive migraine that lasted 10 days. This condition I am working to heal shifts regularly, often along with the changing seasons. I suppose that was the season of the migraine, because while there have been migraines, I haven’t
You Grow Girl Seeds 2019
I’m a little late, but back in full swing offering seeds for the 2019 growing season in my online shop. In the past I sold them through an Etsy shop, but when they made some prohibitive policy changes last summer, I knew it was time to merge my seeds into my online shop. Now you
Gardens Are Alive
Some would say there is too much going on here. That it lacks cohesiveness. But when I pass by this now empty stretch of concrete (the garden has been gone for years), it feels deadened and lifeless. I’ll take colourful and vibrant over lifeless any day. Don’t ever let anyone tell you your garden is

http://z.about.com/6/o/m/gardening_t2.xml,  Wed, 20 Mar 2019 21:19:24 GMT  


A Gardener's Notebook,  Wed, 20 Mar 2019 21:19:24 GMT  

Flowering Now: Gerbera Daisy in the Garden via Instagram
What is your favorite flower? Leave a comment and share! It is always a welcome surprise to see these Gerbera Daisies popping up in the garden. They were originally decorations from a close friends memorial service and each time they appear they remind me of him. A great way to keep someone in your memories year […]

What is your favorite flower? Leave a comment and share!

It is always a welcome surprise to see these Gerbera Daisies popping up in the garden. They were originally decorations from a close friends memorial service and each time they appear they remind me of him. A great way to keep someone in your memories year after year. 

Flowering Now: Gerbera Daisy in the Garden via Instagram


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* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Flowering Now: Clivia Blooms in the Garden via Instagram
What is your favorite flower? Leave a comment and share! I bought these clivia on discount last Fall and now they are blooming in the garden. I am sure the large amount of rain we received has helped but it great to have some color in this shady part of the garden.   and Follow Don’t miss […]

What is your favorite flower? Leave a comment and share!

I bought these clivia on discount last Fall and now they are blooming in the garden. I am sure the large amount of rain we received has helped but it great to have some color in this shady part of the garden. 

Flowering Now: Clivia Blooms in the Garden via Instagram


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* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library

Historical Garden Books: Guide to the conservatory (1842) by Richard Bainbridge – 34 in a Series
Archive.org has a host of old gardening books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of  Historical Garden Books: […]

Archive.org has a host of old gardening books (from mid-19th to mid-20th Century) available in many formats and on a host of topics. I happened across a few in my Pinterest feed and gone completely down the rabbit hole in this treasure trove of information. Sure some ideas might be out of 

Historical Garden Books: Guide to the conservatory (1842) by Richard Bainbridge – 34 in a Series

Historical Garden Books:  Guide to the conservatory (1842) by by Richard  Bainbridge  - 34  in a SeriesHistorical Garden Books:  Guide to the conservatory (1842) by by Richard  Bainbridge  - 34  in a Series

Download in Text, PDF, Single Page JPG, TORRENT from Archive.org

PREFACE.

An introduction to a book may be so far useful as it may serve to explain the writer’s design, and en- able the reader to pass a fair judgment upon his performance ; for unless his particular view be well understood and considered, it is possible that he may be rashly censured for disappointing those hopes which he could not have fulfilled without de- parting from his plan. One or two observations, however, will, in the present instance, be sufficient to apprize the reader what he may expect from this publication. It is intended, then, merely as a Guide to the Greenhouse and Conservatory ; con- taining, in as concise a manner as possible, those necessary directions for keeping up a succession of bloom during every month of the year ; so that the Conservatory may never be wanting in a display of that beauty and loveliness which ever adorns the vernal season, and renders its name, Spring, so pe- culiarly and gracefully appropriate.

The Author’s next object is, to place within the reach of every student of the science of Floricul- ture, an easy and practical treatise on a select list of the most choice and admired plants of the pre- sent day ; so as to enable him to pursue his studies with pleasure, ease, and perspicuity, that he may fulfil the several departments of his office, without encumbering his time with those experiments ne- cessary to the attainment of so valuable a know- ledge. If the humble efforts of the Author’s pen have accomplished this end, he will feel himself richly compensated, in being enabled to contribute to the advancing of one step towards the acquisition of useful knowledge. At the same time, he begs to tender his heartfelt thanks to those useful cultiva- tors of Horticultural and Floricultural science who have so kindly aided him in his arduous task ; especially in furnishing him with the valuable in- formation given on the treatment of several par- ticular plants.

More information on this book:

Publication date 1842
Publisher London, R. Baldwin
Digitizing sponsor The Library of Congress
Language English
 
 
Find more information on garden history with these books

* A portion of each sale from Amazon.com directly supports our blogs
** Many of these books may be available from your local library. Check it out!
† Available from the LA Public Library


http://www.sciencedaily.com/rss/plants_animals/botany.xml,  Wed, 20 Mar 2019 21:19:24 GMT  


http://www.goarticles.com/feeds/Gardening/recent.rss,  Thu, 17 Nov 2016 20:04:57 GMT  


http://www.seattlepi.com/rss/gardening_2.rss,  Wed, 20 Mar 2019 21:19:24 GMT  


http://blog.gardenersworld.com/feed/,  Wed, 20 Mar 2019 21:19:25 GMT  


,  Wed, 15 Aug 2018 22:33:02 GMT  


Organic Gardening News and Advice,  Wed, 20 Mar 2019 21:19:25 GMT  

New Book of Short Stories from Mort Mather
A Stone's Throw, Orvie's Stories
Back in the earliest days of the internet, Mort Mather looked around for someone to help him publish his work in this new cyberspace thing. He found me. We published his archive of organic gardening information which has helped hundreds of thousands of people garden organically.

We've been friends ever since. In fact, he still owes us a dinner at his son's excellent restaurant in Wells, Maine: Joshua's. Mort grows most of the restaurant's fresh, organic produce every year.

Mort's new book is A Stone's Throw, Orvie's Stories. You can read several pages of praise for these short stories on his site. Here's a taste:

“Mort Mather has captured the feel, the sounds and smells of rural life in the 40's”—U.S. Congresswoman Chellie Pingree

“Mort's writing is every bit as wonderful as the food in his splendid restaurant.”—J. Courtney Sullivan, author of the New York Times best­selling novels Commencement, Maine, and The Engagements

“A Stone's Throw is a wonderful collection of stories, told from the perspective of Orvie, a young boy growing up in the 1940s. Orvie's world is a swirl of outdoor adventures, forts, farm animal, school, chores, and family struggles. Through witty dialogue, rich descriptions of life on the farm, and the captivating voice of Orvie himself, Mort Mather invites you to enter Orvie's childlike imagination, and to remember your own. I love these stories and I know you will too.”—Patricia Leavy, Ph.D., best­selling author or Blue and Low­Fat Love 

A Stone's Throw is available from Maine Writers Publishing. Visit Mort's site to find out how to get an autographed copy!

Mort is a shareholder of Good to Go Farm-to-Counter, LLC, our small, organic and local food takeout restaurant opening soon in Cherry Valley, NY. We still have $100 shares in the LLC available to our friends. To find out how you can invest, click here!



Farm to Counter: The Next Great Thing
To call this a "grilled cheese" would be an insult.
We've been working on creating Good to Go, our local and organic food takeout restaurant, for a few months now. So it was with great interest that we read this recent article in the New York Times on the "farm to counter" movement. It's the Next Great Thing!

After decades of public hand-wringing about the empty calories and environmental impact of fast food, the farm-to-table notions that have revolutionized higher-end American restaurants have finally found a lucrative spot in the takeout line. The result already has a nickname: farm to counter. 

“This is not a passing fad,” said B. Hudson Riehle, the research director for the National Restaurant Association, who added that locally grown food and sustainability were the top two customer priorities reported this year in the group’s annual poll of American chefs. “It’s only going to get stronger.”

We knew this was a good idea, but we had no idea the idea was already catching on and some farm-to-counter operations are already becoming chain restaurants. If you're interested in getting in on the ground floor of the Good to Go project, which we now hope could become a chain someday, get involved! We're crowd-funding a 20% share of the company!
Good to Go is Good to Go So Let's Go!
The following post is from our new site for our new business: Good to Go Organic and Local Food Takeout Restaurant. Robin and I jumped on the chance to take over the very small space of the former Nectar Hills Farm store in Cherry Valley, NY, and turn it into a small, to-go only restaurant featuring organic and local food from our area. 

We are crowd-funding the venture--offering shares for $100 worth 0.1% of the company. We hope to sell 200 shares, worth 20% of the company. We're asking our friends, family, and readers to buy shares and support this effort to bring local and organic food to the tables, sidewalks, and picnic areas of our beautiful part of the central leather-stocking region of upstate NY. Visit the website for more information on how to invest (be sure to read the business plan).

The storefront of Good to Go Organic and
Local Food Takeout Restaurant in Cherry Valley, NY
Hi, Everyone,

My lease is signed, and 17 1/2 Main Street is waiting patiently for me to turn it into a tasty, healthy dynamo of a little kitchen. To do that, I'll need a bank loan, and to get that, I need an impressive show of support. From Friends, Family, Sustainable Food Enthusiasts, Upstate Small Business Investors, and of course, the many that want to see our dear Cherry Valley flourish. 

Here are the details

The bottom line is this:  When I open, I will give this kitchen all I have:  my heart and soul, blood, sweat and tears, and time and energy.  The copious amount of encouraging words I've received has been overwhelming,  but what I need from each of you now is another cliche altogether: put your money where your mouth is. 

If you can't afford a whole share, go in on one with somebody.  That's only fifty bucks:  one for every year of my life that has led me to this very point. Please, I am raring to go. Literally: Good To Go.  Help me get started: stomachs, palates, lives, minds, farms, the economy, the state, karma, earth...all these things will improve with this venture. Get excited with me. 

Love and thanks,
Robin Supak
Peas and Greens are Not Enough--Good Thing We Have Ramps!
Organic fertilizer honor wagon near Roseboom, NY
It's mud season up here in the Northeast, and this is the time of year I start itching to get in the mud  pit. It's also the time of year I envy you folks at more southern latitudes, who are probably already eating things from your garden. We're still a few weeks away from eating the ramps (aka wild leeks) that have poked up through the leaf carpet in the woods behind our house, little oases of green in the sea of brown.

Harvesting ramps, by the way, is considered foraging, but since they're just a few steps away from the back garden rows, and we take careful steps to make sure they spread (we only take 25% of each patch, we collect the seeds and spread them in new areas, and we sometimes plant bulbs in new areas), it's kind of like they're part of the garden. A delicious, garlicy, spinachy, oniony, leaky, mouth watering part of the garden [Homer Simpson gurgling sounds]...

All the muddy beds were overwintered with our local, organic nitrogen source, pictured here bagged and for sale in its honor wagon down the road. There's not much I can do until that mud dries up and I can get out there and plant. In the mean time, I've been bringing in more manure and building beds in areas that dry out faster, where I've been planting early greens, spinach, and peas. The deer really love the young pea shoots, but when it's still dropping below freezing at night (the forecast low for tonight is 25), I have to put a plastic tunnel cover over the row anyway, to keep the ground temp up, and that keeps the deer away from the peas until they're big enough that the deer aren't interested anymore.

Someday I'll stop playing those silly games with the wild animals, and just put an electric fence up, but for now, it's all about row covers, timing, and trapping and relocating. Last year I didn't get the trap up until after the woodchuck had eaten all the dill. This year, the trap is out already.

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Gardening Question of the Day (from The Old Farmer's Almanac),  Wed, 20 Mar 2019 21:19:25 GMT  

Gardening Question of the Day for Wednesday, March 20, 2019
In late winter/early spring, I am going to prune a large burning bush. I want to prune it to about half its size. Is that too much? (answer).

From The Old Farmer's Almanac.


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